In order to adjust brightness and to facilitate dialogue about the role of data science, our films are selected on actual discussions in our society. Therefore, all films are introduced by a keynote speaker and followed by a panel discussion or a participative dialogue session.
Below, you will find our events, keynote speakers, and the line-up of the films.

A warm welcome to new students (invitation only)

Thursday

August 26

20:30
Convent Garden (Open air) & Chapel
SURPRISE MOVIE

To welcome the new student to JADS and to 's-Hertogenbosch, IDSFF will organise a special surprise screening.

 

The Art of Finding

Friday

August 27

16:00
Chapel
The Art of Finding (Film: Finding Tom Bombadil)

Filmmaker and 'holistic detective' Joost van de Loo redefines the art of finding. In Finding Tom Bombadil he sets out on a quest to find his favourite fictional character that is supposed to be centuries old. Coincidences and chance encounters lead him to investigate candidates across five different continents, helped by a host of volunteers, field researchers and advisers.

In his introduction to the film, Joost will elaborate on the role of a holistic detective and on the art of finding. Do not expect definitive answers though, because after years of searching he has realised that his search has only just begun.  

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What if the machine wins?

Friday

August 27

20:30
Convent Garden (Open air)
What if the machine wins? (Film: AlphaGo)

According to chess master Emanuel Lasker "the rules of Go are so elegant, organic, and rigorously logical that if intelligent life forms exist elsewhere in the universe, they almost certainly play Go". But what if an 'artificial intelligent life form' exists that is able to beat humans at their own game? How do we cope with losing a game that has always been won by a human for at least 2500 years? Are we gracious winners or sore losers? 

The film will be introduced by dr. Esther Keymolen

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Can we find God in numbers?

Saturday

28 August

16:00
Chapel
Can we find God in numbers? (Film: Pi)

It is often said that mathematics is the language of the universe.

The film Pi is a story about a mathematician with an obsession to find underlying order in the world. It contrasts two seemingly irreconcilable entities: the imperfect, irrational behaviour of humanity and the rigor and regularity of mathematics. The film explores themes of religion, mysticism, and the relationship of the universe to mathematics.  

The hero of the story is Maximillian Cohen. He believes that nature can be expressed in numbers and there are patterns everywhere in nature. If he can detect these patterns, he can predict anything; the stock market, chaos, and God. Basically, he will then unlock the mystery of existence. Pi is a study in madness and -in contrast- genius.

The film will be introduced by prof. dr. Eric Postma

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The border between man and machine

Saturday

August 28

20:30
Convent Garden (Open air)
Transcendence

In popular conception Artificial Intelligence may develop beyond human understanding and control, and eventually may even surpass human intelligence. Transcendence is based on this very notion. It is a philosophical movie that forces us to think about technology-ethics. The protagonists of the movie are scientists trying to create a sentient machine. When one of them is shot, the option arises to transcend the border between man and machine and to upload his conscience. But when a physical object is destroyed and subsequently reassembled in some other form, it might retain the essence of the original thing but it is still the same? As the real world merges with the virtual world, will reality become a mere adjunct of the virtual? And are the digital selves we create online extensions of ourselves or do they eventually take lives of their own? 

The film will be introduced by dr. Frank Bosman

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1984 1/2 - Human vs. Data

Sunday

August 29

16:00
Chapel
Brazil

In a dystopian society where the government constantly gathers detailed data on each of its citizens, Sam Lowry is a low-ranking bureaucrat who is content with his menial job. When a small mistake in a data center leads to a wrongful arrest, a series of events is set in motion which lead Lowry into the depths of the Ministry of Information and beyond, into his dreams.

To create an atmosphere of timelessness, the movie uses dated technology as a replacement for modern technology. As such, it gives a chilling view of the way people's lives are controlled by a vast bureaucracy that channels streams of data on all individual citizens into automatic actions to regulate society -- a society in which a single-letter mistake can snowball into dramatic changes in people's lives for which no one feels responsible.

The film is generally considered by film critics to be one of the best British films of all time. Even if one has seen it before, the fantastic visuals and numerous details in every frame make it worth seeing multiple times.

Prof.dr.ir. Pieter Spronck will introduce the movie. He will explain some of the hidden symbolism in the movie, and will discuss the parallels between the movie and today's society where the dangers of use and misuse of data are concerned. He will also provide some background on the making of the movie, and in particular on how director Terry Gilliam's fight with the studios to get the movie in theaters with his vision intact was ironically similar to the plight of the movie's protagonist. 

 

God from the machine

Sunday

August 29

20:30
Chapel
Ex Machina

The title Ex Machina refers to the phrase 'Deus ex Machina', God from the machine. The term originates from ancient Greek theater, when actors playing gods would be carried onto stage by a machine. These gods would then serve as the ultimate arbiters of right and wrong and decide how the story would end. But this film is just called Ex Machina, without the "Deus." A machine without a god. What could this mean?

Peter de Kock, Professor of Practice in Datascience in Crime & Safety at JADS, will explain some of the hidden meanings of Ex Machina. And while at it, he will elaborate on the problem statement of modern day society, in which humans may be seen as an archaic species in transition, distinguished by Stone age emotions, Medieval institutions, and God-like technology.

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